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Earth’s atmosphere could be one source of water on the moon, UAF study finds



Depiction of water/ice on the moon’s poles. (NASA)

University of Alaska Fairbanks scientists are learning water on the moon — its origins, the place it’s positioned and the way a lot could also be there. The water could possibly be beneficial to improvement of a moon base.

UAF Geophysical Institute affiliate professor Gunther Kletetschka led a workforce that checked out one supply of moon water, the moon’s impression with hydrogen and oxygen ions throughout its passages by means of the tail of earth’s magnetosphere.

Kletetschka stated his group studied “how the water would get from the earth to the moon, using this periodic passage of the moon through this magnetic tail, and how much water would be able to be transferred.”

According to an article about moon water on the Planetary Society web site, lunar missions have confirmed the presence of water, most prominently as ice in sun-shaded craters on the moon’s poles. To attempt to higher find and quantify the water, Kletetschka and his workforce used information from a NASA lunar orbiter to find gravitational anomalies that point out deep-water deposits.

“We have this gravity field technique which allows us to locate exactly where the water would go if it’s deposited in the polar regions of the moon, and we find that there was a distribution of this kind of a water indicator around impact craters,” Kletetschka stated.

Researchers estimate that the moon’s poles may include 840 cubic miles of water — about as a lot as Lake Huron, the Earth’s eighth largest lake.

Better understanding the moon’s water useful resource is vital to NASA’s Artemis Project, which goals to determine a sustainable human presence at a base on the moon’s south pole. The moon’s ice and water could possibly be sourced for ingesting water and air and likewise used to create a gasoline for house automobiles.

Kletetschka’s workforce’s analysis was printed within the journal Scientific Reports in March.

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